Category Archives: Book

The Alley Cat

Table of Contents
<< Chapter 4                                                                                                  Chapter 6 >>

430th Year of
Emperor Valek Foger XXVI

Vaughn worked around the ship doing routine maintenance for the rest of the afternoon.  In the late evening, he walked downtown, towards the market to get a bite to eat and a change of clothes.

After growing up and spending the first half of his life in the military establishment, Vaughn was accustomed to wearing a uniform.  When he left the military, he’d adopted a kind of civilian uniform in a similar fashion.  Hanging in his berth back on the ship were five pairs of brown pants, each spaced five centimeters apart.  Next to that were five cream colored shirts with brown buttons.  Five soft, form-fitting shirts were folded on the shelf next to five pairs of socks.  His closet was a model of organization.  On this trip, he’d added a formal suit for the funeral.

Continue reading The Alley Cat

Advertisements

The Desert

 

Table of Contents
<<Chapter 6                                                                                                    Chapter 8>>

Nyko wasted no time dragging the trailer into the garage.  He attached a hose to the exhaust of the truck, ran it out the roll up door and closed it down.  There was a small gap at the bottom, but it was better than dying of carbon monoxide poisoning.

He worked quickly to load the two custom bikes onto the four-slot bike trailer.  When they were finished, he rolled his bike onto the trailer, attached it to the truck and drove it back to the warehouse.

Continue reading The Desert

The Funeral

Table of Contents
<< Chapter 3                                                                                                  Chapter 5 >>

AUTHOR’S NOTE:  This book skips around in time a bit.  Not in a timey-wimey time-travel sort of way, but through flashbacks and Vaughn’s memories.  The heading at the top of the page tells you the year.  The “main” story happened in 432, this chapter, for example, takes place in 430.

430th Year of
Emperor Valek Foger XXVI

Two years earlier, when Vaughn got word that his best friend Fresia’s father was dead, he set out that afternoon for Foger.  Matthew was sick, so Sarah stayed home with him.  She gave her husband strict orders to send Fre her love.  After the funeral, the pair walked a block over and two blocks up to a little bar called “Twinings.”  Vaughn slipped the bouncer at the door a few crench and he led them towards the back, past the stage where a Human girl danced, grinding on a pole to the bass-heavy music.  She peeled a tiny string-top off and tossed it to the side, shaking her breasts at Vaughn and Fresia as they passed.   “Hey, Fre,” she called.  “Who’s the hunk?”

Fresia smiled slightly as she looked at the dancer.  “Hey Skye. He’s an old war buddy,” she replied as she slipped into a booth.  The bartender arrived seconds later with two moges.  The thick, dark brown, malty beverages were their drink of choice.  “Thanks Bode,” she replied and took a long drink.

“I’m so sorry about your dad, Fre,” Vaughn said.  “He was a good man.”

“He was.”  Her eyes were distant as she dwelled on his memory.  Vaughn didn’t bother pushing her for conversation.  Eventually, her eyes refocused on her friend.  “That’s kind of why I asked you here.  You’re the only one I knew to call.  Dad was murdered, Vaughn.  They called it an accident, but he was killed, I just know it.  He was in great shape, and had a physical two weeks ago.”

Vaughn took a long drink from his moge.  “That’s a big accusation.  Do you have something we can go on?  If you do we’ll find the bastard and I’ll skin him alive.”

Fresia took a long drink herself, draining her glass.  “When we find the bastard, I’m going to skin him alive.  Then I’ll apply dermal bandaging, and skin him again.  When I’m done with him, he’s going to wish I’d fed him to a heard of gnarg.

“Tell me what you know, Fre.”  Vaughn nodded to the bartender who brought another moge for Fresia.

“Dad was into something.  He told me he was going to do this one deal, and then he’d be out.  This one was going to set him up to retire.”

“Any idea what it was?”

“I don’t have anything concrete, but I’m pretty sure it was worine.”

Vaughn suddenly knew why Fresia had chosen this bar.  The music made it impossible for anyone to eavesdrop.  “Shit, Fre.  What was he doing mixed up in worine? That shit is big time.  People die from just one small dose.  What the hell was he doing pushing?”

“I dunno, Vaughn.  I don’t even know for sure that’s what it was, but he was hanging out with a bunch of Geraldinian thugs.”

Vaughn took a sip of his moge and set the glass down on the table.  The girl over Fresia’s shoulder was working hard to get his attention in hopes that he’d slide a few crench into a lacy band on her thigh.  She was extraordinarily beautiful, but Sarah would never approve.  He tried not to look, but she was good at her job, and she was physically perfect.  He briefly wondered if she could carry on a conversation.

“Where can we find these guys?”  Vaughn asked, tearing himself away from the beautiful woman.

“They hang out at a club on the outside of town.  Skye dances there sometimes.  She got me in last night to check it out.  Small joint, front door has two bouncers.  Kitchen door leads to an alley.  Main room has a big bar, maybe fifteen tables, and there’s a back room.  I couldn’t get back there; Skye says that’s where they hold private parties.”

Vaughn pictured the place in his mind.  Since his mother passed away he didn’t ever come to this part of town when he was on Foger.  “What’s the name of the joint?”

“It’s a Human bar, taken over by Geraldinians.  They just showed up and muscled all the regulars out.  Called the Alley Cat.”

“What’s the plan? What do you need from me?”

“Skye got me a gig dancing there tonight.  I’m going to kill them all, but I won’t have anywhere to hide a weapon.  I’m worried I can’t take them all unarmed.”

Vaughn laughed.  “You’re going to be dancing? After our homecoming gala?”

“Skye’s shown me a few moves,” she replied with a smirk.  “I got the job, so I can’t be that bad.”

“Fair enough,” he smiled and then asked, “How’s security? Am I going to be able to carry something in?”

Fresia shook her head.  “I don’t think so.  Just gonna be us.”

Vaughn thought for a minute.  “How are we going to handle Empire Security?  They’ll be there in just a couple minutes.”

“Skye’s my backup on that.  She’ll say one of them grabbed me, I slapped him and things got rough.”

“Think it’ll fly?”  Vaughn looked doubtful.

“There’s been a huge influx of incidents involving Geraldinians sexually assaulting Human women.  Ever since they took over the low-quarter, it’s like they have something to prove.  Bunch of macho assholes.”

Vaughn resigned himself.  Fresia was his best friend, and had been by his side since his third year at the Institute.  When he was named Captain of The Reetus, she was his only choice for first officer.  “I wish Hold was here.  Geraldinians are fucking tough bastards.”

Fre nodded.  “Me too, but he’s busy on Savye, he’s up to his ass in debt and the ruling council is breathing down his neck.  He can’t get away.”

“Anything else I need to know before this goes down tonight?”

Fre shook her head.  “I think that’s it.  Get in, bust heads, get information, and get out.”

“Alright, I need to run a few errands; I’ll head to The Alley Cat about twenty-six hundred?”  A Fogerian day ran for thirty hours.  The longer days and nights had significantly upset the circadian rhythm of early Humans.  These days, Humans were used to it, although their bodies never developed a need to sleep longer.

The pair stood up.  Vaughn hugged Fresia and said, “We’ll find out what happened and there will be justice.”

She looked at him squarely in the eyes.  “Thank you, Vaughn.  For everything.  I don’t know what I’d do without you.” As Fresia passed Skye, she paused, slipped a handful of crench into her garter.  Skye bent down and kissed her with a passion that surprised Vaughn.

When it was his turn to walk by, she shook her boobs at him.  He turned slightly red, slipped whatever bills he had in his pocket into her garter, and walked out, rubbing lipstick off of his cheek.

Vaughn headed straight for the central market.  He passed store after store, selling everything from gnarg steaks to hand-made tak bars, moge and harder liquors, flowers and transports.  Anything legal could be purchased there in the central market.  For those looking for less-than-legal items, as Vaughn was that afternoon, one just had to know where to look.

He buttoned his coat and slipped into the side door of Miss Autumn’s, one of Vaughn’s old haunts when he was a bachelor living on Foger.  The side door was reserved for special patrons.  Vaughn hoped that title was for life, because he hadn’t been a good customer for a number of years.  As he closed the door behind him, a high pitched voice called out to him.  “Vaughn! Honey, I’m so glad you’ve come home.  Finally decided to ditch that old ball and chain?”

“Hi, Misty,” said Vaughn, looking over at a beautiful blonde.  She was wearing a completely see-through bikini with tall heels and nothing else.  Eight years hadn’t changed her a bit.  She was sitting on a long sofa, with her legs crossed.  She kicked one leg innocently when Vaughn looked up.  “I’m still married.  Sarah’s doing well.  I have a son these days,” he said, smiling.

“Oh, Vaughn.  It’s a shame to see a man like you put out to pasture.”  Misty put one foot over on the couch and ran her hands down her body, lingering between her legs.  “Almost ten years I’ve been waiting for you to come back.  No one makes me scream like you.”

Vaughn shook his head.  “I got everything I need at home.”

“Why don’t you bring her along next time you come?”  Misty ran her hands up to her breasts and squeezed them.  “I play well with others.”

“That’s great, but I don’t.  It’s been good catching up, baby, but is Mikey still downstairs? I need to have a talk with him.”

“Yeah, fine, whatever,” said Misty, standing up.  As she walked past Vaughn to a small desk on the far side of the room, her skin went from milky white to dark green.  Her legs and arms lengthened, and a tail peeked out from her backside and waved at him.  She pushed a button on the desk, causing a door to open right beside Vaughn.

Her voice was much lower this time, as she said, “Last chance.  I can look just like her if it makes you feel any better.”

Vaughn nodded his head towards her and stepped down the stairs.

Halfway down he heard a voice call up, “Vaughn fucking Troupe.  What brings a badass motherfucker like you to my little hole in the world?”

“Mikey,” said Vaughn, stepping out into the underground shop.  “It’s good to see you man.”

Mikey was less than a meter in height and covered in shaggy green and brown fur.  He moved with deadly grace, in contradiction to his comical exterior.

“What brings you down?”

Vaughn held his empty hands out.  “I’m in a spot.  Some shit going down tonight and I could use something concealable that can even the odds.  Gotta get past a couple door guys.”

“Must be something big if you’re looking for a force multiplier.”  He held up his hands to stop Vaughn, who wasn’t going to say anything anyway.  “I don’t want to know. I have enough problems with the ES as it is.  I got just the thing for you, check it.”

Mikey disappeared behind the counter.  It sounded like he was throwing pots and pans, guns, knives, sticks, and batons aside.  When he reemerged, he was triumphantly holding a crench.

“Look at this son of a bitch.  I swear The Emperor, may he guide us safely through, would take this note himself.  But… you pull just right… and a little twist.” Mikey fumbled with the note for a second. “Hold on, it’s something like this.”  He fumbled with the note a little more before it tore in half.  “Alright… That was a real crench.  But hang on.  I got more shit.”  Mikey ran off to the back of the store.

Vaughn passed the time looking at the high-end plasma rifles hanging on pegs on the wall.  Everything on display was legal to sell, although some of Mikeys sources were slightly less than reputable.  Finally, the small man bounded out of the back room, backflipped off a Human size chair and landed in front of Vaughn holding up a ring.

“Tenth-gram of Argimonium.  Delivers ten thousand volts on contact.  Turns your punches into real stunners.”

“That’s perfect.  How much?”

“Can you bring me half a gram next time you’re in town?”  Mikey looked up at Vaughn.  His eyes were impossibly big.

“Half-gram?  Mikey… I’d take an ass whupping for a half-gram.  I’ll bring you a fifth.”

“Make it a quarter gram and we have a deal.”  Mikey reached up to shake Vaughn’s hand.

Vaughn looked down at his old friend.  “Fine,” he said.  “One quarter gram.”  The pair shook hands to seal the deal, and then Vaughn headed back to the ship to find some way to pass the time.

Please consider purchasing The Evolution of Vaughn on Amazon.  It’s $2.99.  That few bucks goes to supporting me, and I appreciate that more than I could ever tell you.

Table of Contents
<< Chapter 3                                                                                                  Chapter 5 >>

I Need More Power

Table of Contents
<< Chapter 2                                                                                                  Chapter 4 >>

432nd Year of
Emperor Valek Foger XXVI

Vaughn worked in the cargo hold, stripping panels that lead to power conduits and reconnecting old circuits.  “How many can I run based on our current generation capabilities, without disabling any of the modifications?”

“I was originally designed to host a compliment of seventy five guns.  Pushing the current generators to one hundred ten percent would allow for seventeen.”

Continue reading I Need More Power

Homeward

Table of Contents
<< Chapter 1                                                                                                  Chapter 3 >>

Date: 432nd Year of
Emperor Valek Foger XXVI

A week after Matty was stung by the shrolg, the ship’s computer woke Vaughn from his nap in his seat in the galley.  Her soft, silky voice came from everywhere and nowhere.  “Sir, we are nearing Vaughnville.”

Vaughn sat up in his berth and scrubbed his fingers through his long, dirty hair before wiping the sleep from the inside corners of his eyes.  The transport captain cleared his voice and spoke out loud, “Halle, drop us out of the fold.  I’ll come up and pilot the approach.  Vaughnville?  Really?”

“You’ve lived there for fifteen years, Captain.  It needs a name.”

“I know.  But Vaughnland?  You make me out to be quite the egotist.”

“Perhaps something historic then?  The name of the earliest Earth settlement in my memory is Sharonton.  There was also an earth city called Duluth, and one called Red River Falls.  Queen Willa the Great was from Red River Falls.”

“I remember history classes, Halle.  Sharonton?  I like it.  How about New Sharonton?”

Instinctively, Vaughn reached out and grabbed the railing high along the wall.  The entire ship shuddered as Halle unfolded space around the bubble containing the ship.

“Argimonium levels at eighty percent.  Approaching New Sharonton at one quarter light.”

“Slow us to approach speed.  How is the field looking?” He asked, letting go of the railing and swinging his legs off his seat and into his boots on the steel flooring.  Every floor of the ship was metal.  If the gravity generators failed, he could slip magnetic soles into his boots and still be able to maneuver around the ship.

“Magnetic field strength around New Sharonton is forty one percent above operational parameters.  Full systems shutdown will be required during ionosphere re-entry.”  That magnetic field was the reason Vaughn Troupe had chosen this particular moon to call home.  It kept the E’Clei sensors from detecting the argimonium fields on the moon, and that kept his family safe.  The field was caused by the gravitational interplay between the iron core of the moon Vaughn called “home” and the massive gas giant it revolved around.

When the system’s sun and his moon’s gas giant were in alignment, the tidal swell was enough to bring the ocean to his doorstep.  At low tide, the ocean was almost forty miles away across a massive salt flat.

Vaughn sat down in the captain’s chair and punched a series of buttons on the arm rest.  Three virtual screens appeared in the air in front of him.  The far left showed the optimal approach path and his ship’s trajectory.  The far right was the tactical screen, weapons systems and sensors.  The middle screen had his focus at the moment, it was the flight controls.   He adjusted speed and attitude, pitched over and started the descent.

“Halle, full shutdown.  All controls to manual.”

“Yes Sir.  Have a safe landing, Vaughn.”

“Thanks, Halle.  Have a nice nap.”

Seconds later, the projections disappeared and the cover of the dash rolled back to reveal a large ball and dozens of buttons and levers.  He put one hand on top of the sphere, and rolled it back and forth.  Thrusters fired from the left and right side.  He pushed the levers back and felt the drive thruster spin up.  A huge ball of blue flame shot out the back of the ship, which lurched forward and nosed over towards the surface of the moon.

Manual reentry was always a thrill for Vaughn.   As the air thickened outside the ship, the hull heated, causing it to expand.  Tings, pops, creaks and groans sounded off all throughout the aging ship.  “Come on baby, hold together for me,” he whispered.

Halle was a great ship.  Just after the Battle of Bruth, Vaughn had found her floating in space, lifeless, not a soul aboard.  He ordered her dragged into his cargo bay of his independence class warship, and there she sat, waiting.  He spent most of his off time working on her.

This ship had started its life as a short range intra-stellar fighter for the Fogerian Empire, but Vaughn had other plans for a second life.  He installed her AI, renamed her Halle, and every hour he wasn’t on the bridge, he spent inside Halle dreaming of the life he’d have afterward.  A second life for both Vaughn and Halle, exploring deep space with his wife and the son he hadn’t yet met in person.

Folding space required a massive amount of computing power.  Without the exact calculation, a ship could end up millions of light years from its target destination.  Even with the most up to date star charts in the Fogerian Empire, a captain who was a million light years off course could spend months or even years trying to figure out where they were and which way they should go.

Throughout the war Vaughn requisitioned computer parts as replacements or spares for his battle ship, The Reetus.  High Command didn’t complain about the extra parts, they considered them an investment.  All the improvements Vaughn made to his battleship’s navigational computers benefitted the entire fleet.  He never told them that he used all of those improvements in Halle’s core, let alone that she was the reason he was ordering all those parts.

As far as his superiors knew, he blew out a processor testing improvements to his own ship.  Halle could compute coordinates in a fraction of a second that took the E’Clei an hour to compile.  She was designed to function in deep space; Vaughn wanted to expand The Empire’s star charts.  He wanted to find a sector of space where there were no E’Clei.  No threat of the microscopic parasites invading his brain, killing everything that made him unique and wearing his corpse like a suit.

Sitting in the completely redesigned cockpit of his ship, Vaughn pushed the throttle and rolled the thruster control sphere forward.  He reached up and hit several buttons on the ceiling, causing the ship to roll again until Vaughn was facing straight up in the captain’s chair.  Another button activated the Cockpit Angle Servos.   A regular Interceptor class ship was a long, skinny tube, pointed at one end with four massive engines at the other.  Interceptors were capable of landing on the surface, the housing around the four massive engines served as landing gear, but the vehicle was primarily designed to stay in space.  Halle was built to dock with a larger ship or space station; the crew would then take a shuttle to the surface.  In her previous life, she was a space faring war-bird, but now she’d been repurposed for long-range exploration. Vaughn wanted to be able to live in the ship while she was on the surface of a planet.

Vaughn fired the landing thrusters, slowing the ship through the upper atmosphere, before reaching up to the ceiling once again to restart Halle.

“Nicely done, Captain.  Shall I take over?”

“Take me home, Halle,” Vaughn said, unbuckling his harness.  He walked down the hall toward the cargo hold where he had a month’s worth of supplies strapped down and waited until the ship touched down to open the door.  He bounded out of the ship and crossed the hundred meter landing pad in three steps.  The half gravity of his home was familiar to him.  These days he was much more graceful than when he’d first arrived, although back then, he’d only had one leg.

The surface of New Sharonton was something of a kaleidoscope.  The land shifted with the tides twice a day.  Often, entire hills would move several meters.  There was almost no vegetation on this part of the planet but on the opposite side, there were massive rainforests with trees over a thousand meters tall.   They were so tall that the tops peeked above the ever-present clouds.  The purple leaves gathered sun while the lower leaves soaked up moisture and released oxygen.

Vaughn looked out across the sandy planes.  The sky was blue between the clouds, which created massive shadows rolling across the salt-flat to the south.  His house was built just on the far side of the dunes at the edge of the massive salty desert.  Twice a day, ocean water covered the desert in water, and for an hour or so at high tide, Vaughn had an oceanfront home.

At the edge of the landing pad, he expected his son Matt to be waiting for him.  Matt always greeted Vaughn when he returned.  Sarah sometimes came, but his son never missed a trip.

“Halle,” Vaughn said aloud, the chip in his ear connecting him with his ship.  “Scan the area.  Where’s Matt?”

“Sir, there are no life-signs in the immediate area.  Perhaps he’s gone hunting again?”

“Where’s Sarah?  Widen the search.”

“Ionospheric interference is keeping me from accessing my satellites, Vaughn.  Would you like me to launch probes?”

Something wasn’t right.  He was home right on time.  They should be here.  “Not just yet, Halle,” he said, leaping towards his home.  He bounded up a large hill in one push off his artificial leg and tripped over a body in a white robe.

Now panicked, he rolled to his feet and jumped again and again towards his home, over hundreds of bodies.  They all looked the same.

“Halle,” he started, out of breath in the thin atmosphere.  “Dead, bald men in white robes. Gold “M” on their foreheads.  Who are they?”

“Searching, Vaughn.”  Seconds passed as he neared his home.  “Their description matches those of Maxist priests.  An ancient religion, The Maxists believe that a boy named Max was a god sent to Earth in the earth year 2010 to save Humanity from the E’Clei.  The religion believes that Max will return and provide a safe place for all of Human kind.  You know the name as the consortium that controls the vast majority of the argimonium in the galaxy.”

“How many years have they been waiting?”

“Unknown.  It is rumored that Max was a mutated Human immune to the E’Clei parasites, who developed special abilities from their attempted infection.”

“Why would they be here?”

“Also unknown.  I could create suppositions, but there are seven million three hundred thousand six hundred forty two possible reasons there could be dead Maxists on your moon.  The probability of any of them being true is nearly six billion to one.  The most likely is that they were monitoring your argimonium production, although they have no history of being involved in production.”

“Just tell me you have nothing,” he said, running.

“I have nothing, Vaughn.  I suggest launching the probes.”

Desperation crept into Vaughn’s voice.  These Maxists all had plasma burns.  He’d seen these wounds before.  They were from E’Clei weapons.  “Launch them.  Find Matty and Sarah.”

Vaughn reached his house, a solitary circle of green in a vast desert.  The grass was perfectly manicured.  Plants grew up under the windows, and a single tree, planted in the front yard had a swing hanging from one of the limbs, all surrounded by a white picket fence.

The house itself was a replica of an ancient earth home.  When Vaughn was a child, his parents told him stories of Earth and how the E’Clei had come dozens of times over tens of thousands of years in an attempt to take over the planet before it was destroyed in The Colcoa War. Not much information survived the war, but Vaughn’s home planet was ravaged and then destroyed by the E’Clei.  Less than a thousand Humans, led by Queen Willa the Great managed to survive the destruction of the planet.

Vaughn had built this house as a tribute to his ancestors, a small outpost of Humanity in a universe where his people had no real home.  The front door was knocked off its hinges.  Just inside the door, Sarah was laying on her back, clutching a communications link in one hand and an ionic pulse gun in the other.   “Matty!  Matt! Come out!  I’m home!” he shouted.  There wasn’t a sound in the house as he knelt to check Sarah for a pulse.  She was cold.

“Vaughn,” Halle said in his ear.  “The corpses are between twelve and fourteen hours old.  Sensors are expanded out twice as far as Matthew could have travelled in that time.  There are no Humanoid life-signs.  I will continue the search.”

“Matty!” Vaughn called, grabbing the IP gun from Sarah’s hand and placing it gently on her chest.  “Matty! Where are you!”  He ran through the small house, searching every room.  He checked every closet, under the beds, everywhere someone could hide.  There was no sign of his son.

“Captain, Matthew is not on New Sharonton.  I have scanned all of the bodies.  His is not here.  Heat trapped in the concrete of the launch pad indicates a ship left between eight and ten hours ago.”

Feeling utterly lost, Vaughn sat down on Matt’s bed, buried his face in his hands, and wept.  Sarah was dead, his son was gone.  And the E’Clei were to blame for it.  All of years he spent being careful and trying to stay off of the radar had been for nothing.  None of it made any sense.

After several hours, Vaughn headed towards the mine, fired up the excavator and dug two holes.  He dug the first right beside the house, just big enough for Sarah.  The other much more massive hole was over the hill behind the house.   He was sewing Sarah into her favorite sheet when Halle spoke in his ear.  “Captain, I have completed an exhaustive search of the entire moon, including sub-surface scans.  There is no sign of Matthew on the planet.  The plasma burns on the dead Maxists indicate E’Clei involvement, although there is a twenty seven percent chance that is a ruse.  Footprint analysis indicates Romjini E’Clei.”

“How quickly can you get to Romjin?” Vaughn knew the planet, although he’d never been there.  Part of his duty as captain of The Reetus was to know every E’Clei stronghold, even those on the farthest side of E’Clei space.

“Forty-Seven hours, sir.  The Romjini ship would take nearly sixty to make the trip.”

“Halle, you’re not outfitted for war anymore.  And what if they didn’t go to Romjin?”

“It is among the least likely places they would take him, Sir, but I calculated a ninety-seven percent chance that your follow up question would be to ask the time it would take them to travel there.”

Vaughn stitched Sarah the rest of the way up, and lifted her up on to his broad shoulders.  Talking to Halle and creating a plan of what to do next helped him process his emotions.  Being able to take the time to put Sarah to rest allowed him to deal with his grief.  As he walked, he asked, “Where did they take him?”

“Statistically, based on seven hundred eighty thousand known E’Clei tactics, they would have taken him directly to E’Clei.”  Vaughn’s heart sank.  The most defended planet in the known universe.  No Fogerian soldier had ever gotten within two light years of E’Clei.  Not even spies implanted with genetically engineered parasites had ever returned.

The Fogerians were the most advanced race in the universe, other than the E’Clei, who only needed infect a handful of people of any race to have all the knowledge of that species.  The E’Clei were technologically superior and when they killed an enemy, that enemy became one of them.

The Fogerian War ended in a drawdown of hostilities.  The people of Foger said it was because they had done so much damage to the bugs, but Vaughn thought differently.  Vaughn knew the E’Clei would never give up; instead they just altered their priorities.  There were hundreds of trillions of habitable worlds in the universe, and billions of species.  The E’Clei had conquered thousands of them, but as his mother used to say, “There were other fish in the sea.”

With Sarah buried in her garden beside the house, Vaughn started loading the Maxists into the bucket of the loader and dumping them into the massive grave.  He thought best when he was busy, somehow physical labor always made his brain function better.

As he filled in the dirt, the thought struck him.  He ran towards the house and grabbed the communicator Sarah had been holding.

“Halle, find the frequency of this comm.  Adjust for the Doppler effect of the signal bouncing off the magnetic field.  Find the last signal and amplify it.”

“Calculating…  I’ve found it sir.  Would you like to hear it?”

“Yes!” he shouted, and then static filled his ear.  Just under it he could hear the occasional note of Sarah’s voice.

“Filter out the static.  Rebuild the signal based on Sarah’s speech patterns,” he commanded.

Slowly, the static disappeared out of the sound in his ear, until all that was left were a few sounds of Sarah’s voice.  Just syllables and single letter sounds.

“I’ve analyzed all recordings of Sarah’s voice in my database.  Applying suspected patches now.  I’m afraid it doesn’t make much sense, sir.”

“Vaughn.  T.. Avenue. Flat. Romain.”

“Factor in that she was under attack, and The Maxists being here.  She had to have been under extreme stress,” the Captain said.

Sarah’s voice changed again in his ear.  “Vaughn.  They have Matt.  Low eighty…” Sarah’s voice was cut off by Halle.  “Sir, I cannot guess the number.  From her inflection, there was more than eighty.  Probability indicates she was telling you how many Humanoids had Matt.”

“Her mind didn’t work that way, Halle.  Sarah isn’t a soldier.  Enemy combatants wouldn’t matter to her.”

“Recalculating with additional parameters.”

Sarah’s voice again appeared in Vaughn’s ear and he had to choke back tears as she spoke.  “They have Matt.  Low eighty. Ours.”

“You’re a god damned genius, Halle!  They’ve taken Matty to Loe.  We have eighty-something hours to meet them there.  Calculate the fold.  Warm up the engines, we’re taking off.”

“Sir.  I’m a computer, I do not have intelligence as you would categorize it.”

“Shut up and do the math,” Vaughn yelled over the noise of the loader he was riding towards his space dock.  He climbed up the ramp into his ship and hit the button to close the cargo hatch.  “How long?”

“Five hours, thirty four minutes.”

“Recall the probes.”

“They’re on their way back.  Six minutes to planetary probe docking.”

“Organize the satellites, Halle.  We’re going to pick them up too.  We have less than four days and we need to make a stop on the way.”  Vaughn’s boots clanked on the metal catwalk that led up to the galley.

“She won’t be happy to see you, Sir,” Halle said.

“I can’t get my son back without her,” Vaughn replied, buckling himself into the captain’s chair.

“I’ve adjusted our course.  Four hours to the Foger home-world.  I suggest you get some sleep once we get past the field.”

“Too much to do.”  Vaughn piloted the ship through the magnetic field for the second time that day before turning Halle back on and heading towards the back of the ship.

“All six satellites are recaptured and safely stowed.  Brace yourself for the fold.”  Vaughn grabbed on to the railing in the cargo hold.  He heard the familiar sound of the Alcubierre field generators winding up, and then the ship rattled and shook as it rocketed off down the wormhole created between the two layers of folded space-time.

If you are enjoying The Evolution of Vaughn, and would rather read on your kindle or other device with the kindle app (Or just think it’s worth the price of a cup of coffee, you can purchase the book on Amazon.

Table of Contents
<< Chapter 1                                                                                                  Chapter 3 >>

The Evolution of Vaughn

I know sci-fi isn’t the typical genre of zombie lovers, but I really love this book.  I thought if I posted a few chapters, you might give sci-fi a chance 🙂
-Kirk

The Fogerian War Book 1
The Fogerian War Book 1

Vaughn, a human born on a distant planet long after earth has been destroyed, is the first of his race to be invited to the prestigious Fogerian War Institute. After glory in the Fogerian War with the parasitic E’Clei, Vaughn is raised to the rank of Captain, and given command of The Reetus for the duration of the conflict.
Long after the war, Vaughn is married and lives a simple life, mining his remote moon for a precious mineral and raising his son. He arrives home from a routine business trip to find dead members of an ancient human cult called The Maxists littering his moon. Vaughn goes on a quest to find out what happened.
The action heats up when he discovers his son is still alive, and has being held heart of E’Clei territory.
Going to get his son could disrupt the shaky cease-fire between the Fogerians and the E’Clei, igniting an all new war. Leaving his son in the hands of the parasites he spent so much of his life fighting is not an option.
How far will he go to retrieve his son and exact justice from those responsible?

If you’d like to read more, The Evolution of Vaughn is available exclusively on Amazon.

Chapters

Iron Jack’s

Before you read Chapter 4, I’d like to invite you to like my facebook page What Zombies Fear.  The link opens in a new window, so you can click it without losing your place here.

Now, on with the show, thank you for reading.

-Kirk

A new free web story by Kirk Allmond

 

Table of Contents
<<Chapter 4                                                                                                    Chapter 6>>

It took Nyko almost an hour to retrieve the carburetors from the ceiling tiles where he’d hidden them when he locked Iron Jack’s for the last time.  These two choppers were his babies.  He’d crafted them, by hand, in the back of shop.  Even though they sat in the show room, each with a price tag hanging from the handle bars, he’d never really had the heart to sell them.  They were designed to pique the interest of potential buyers, who would want a bike built according to their own specifications.

Nyko started working at Iron Jacks since he was a kid, tinkering on bikes.  At first he did grunt work, adding aftermarket parts and doing minor repair work after school.  When Jack died Nyko was already running the place.  Jack’s son Henry didn’t want any part of the business, so Nyko bought it from him, and grew the business into a successful custom bike shop.

He enjoyed the time getting the two bikes ready to run.  He worked by the light of a small lantern, quickly and quietly, trying not to draw too much attention to himself.  The infected were all around out here, and Nyko knew from experience that light and sound could draw them from miles away.  The work reminded him of better times.

In just a few minutes, the stainless steel carburetors were installed, the batteries had water added, and he added a gallon of fresh ethanol to each.  The fuel lines were all stainless, so there wasn’t any real need to worry about the ethanol rotting rubber tubing.

When they were ready to crank, he resisted the urge to kick the starter and roar off down the road.  He was on a mission.  The old shop truck was in the first garage bay right where it was supposed to be.  He drained the oil out of it, and while that was draining, he topped off the battery with water, and checked his portable jump-starter.  The battery in it was dead too.

His motorcycle was a six-volt, not enough power to turn the old truck’s motor over.

Nyko searched the shop, looking for an old twelve-volt alternator.  While he was looking, he grabbed a pair of jumper cables, and the cordless drill out of his saddlebags.  In his office, he searched through his desk until he found a nine-volt battery.

An hour later, he squeezed the trigger on the cordless drill, spinning the alternator.  The nine-volt battery excited the actuator, and current began to flow through the jumper cables into the old truck’s battery.  He wasn’t sure if it would be enough, but after he’d expended both of the batteries for his drill; the truck turned over slowly and finally fired.

“Fuck yeah!” Nyko shouted when the engine caught.

Without the shop’s air handling systems running, he knew he couldn’t leave the truck running for too long, but he also knew it would take some time to recharge the battery, and his drill was dead.  He knew the noise he’d been making would have drawn several infected to the shop.  His old bike trailer was still parked outside, he’d made sure when he pulled up.

Nyko scouted the shop.  If there were only one or two out there, he wanted to dispatch them as quietly as possible.   The first thing he found was an eighteen inch pipe wrench.  He picked it up and hefted it over his head in a trial run.  “Quit stalling, pussy,” he said under his breath.

He laid the pipe wrench down on the work bench and picked up a pry-bar.  A couple of practice swings later, he laid the crowbar down.  Blunt instruments always resulted in large amounts of bodily fluid.  Even a single drop in the eyes or mouth could result in infection.  The biker laid the crowbar down on the bench, and picked up a long, flat bladed screwdriver.  The shaft was over a foot long, and forged steel.  An idea formed.

A pair of safety goggles hanging on a hook on the back of the bench caught his eye.  Nyko grabbed them and slipped them over his head, resting the goggles just above his forehead.

The cleaning cabinet delivered the second half of his weapon, as he unscrewed the fiberglass handle of the push broom and used two pipe clamps to fasten the screwdriver securely to the end.  He now had an almost seven foot spear, tipped with a massive steel point.  He tied a clean rag from the cabinet around his face, covering his nose and mouth, donned a pair of mechanic’s rubber gloves, and lowered the goggles onto his face.

Nyko checked his keys to make sure he had the right one for the lock on the trailer.  He set the key ring on the bumper of the truck, laid the spear down quietly beside the door, and drew his pistol.  The heavy steel door was good protection, but without any windows, Nyko had no idea how many might be in the general area.

With a deep breath, he lifted the door about waist high, crouched on one knee and peered out into the parking lot.  By the light of the full moon he made out four shapes.  All four immediately turned and started making their way towards him.

“Four. Fuck.” Nyko cursed.  Four was the worst number.   If there’d been five, it was clear he’d have to use his pistol.  No one went hand-to-hand with five.  Three, he could pretty easily take down without making any noise.  But four was always a toss-up.

“What I wouldn’t give for a silencer,” he said, heaving the door the rest of the way up.

The four infected moved quickly.  Nyko holstered his gun and picked up the screwdriver-spear, waiting to see which would make it to him first.

He jabbed outward, piercing the nose of a redhead.  He felt the spear stop against the back of her skull, and quickly pulled it backward.  Pus and gore dribbled down her face as she collapsed.  “Sorry Darlin.  Always did love a redhead,” he said, stabbing another.

The third and fourth infected stepped within spear range at the same time.  Nyko backed up as he speared one straight through the eyeball.  As he removed the spear, the eyeball came with it, stuck at the base of the screwdriver.  He kicked the final one in the chest, pushing it onto the flat of its back.

“I wish you’d just fucking stay down,” he said, stepping towards it.  The infected, of course, didn’t.  The drive to infect others was all they felt.  No humanity, no memories, nothing left of what they were.  Just some genetically manipulated virus created in the basement of some research laboratory contracting muscles and firing enough synapses to keep blood circulating.

It tried to get up, reaching for Nyko’s leg.  He drove the sharpened metal screwdriver through the back of its throat, interrupting the few synapses still firing.

 

Table of Contents
<<Chapter 4                                                                                                    Chapter 6>>

If you’re interested in my other work, please check out kirkallmond.com or my Amazon Author Page